5 Facts About PECOS Revalidation Practices Can’t Afford to Miss

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5 Facts About PECOS Revalidation Practices Can’t Afford to Miss

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Medicare revalidation

Medicare reimbursement likely makes up a large portion of your practice’s income, which means you can’t afford to forfeit that revenue stream. One simple way to keep that income flowing into your practice is to complete your Medicare revalidations by the due date. If you miss a Medicare revalidation deadline, you’ll likely end up excluded from the program and you’ll have to start the Medicare application process all over again from the beginning.

To ensure that you stay on the correct Medicare revalidation timeline, check out five key facts.

1. Medical Practices Revalidate Every Five Years

Medicare requires medical practices to revalidate every five years, while suppliers of Durable Medical Equipment, Prosthetics, Orthotics and Supplies (DMEPOS) must revalidate every three years.

Revalidations are typically due on the last day of the month. So if your provider enrolled in Medicare on December 5, 2017, the revalidation will likely be due on December 31, 2022.

2. Revalidation Notifications Usually Come Through the Mail

In an increasingly digital office, it may be hard to believe that you won’t get revalidation alerts via email, but in some cases, that’s the reality. Your revalidation notifications will often come via snail mail, so practice managers who are working remotely may miss them.

You’ll receive the revalidation notice at the address you listed under “Correspondence Address” when you initially filled out your PECOS enrollment form, so check the mail at that address frequently to avoid missing it. Although the revalidation notices may also come by email, those often go straight to the providers rather than to the practice manager, so you can’t always rely on their arrival.

3. The Medicare Revalidation List Includes Due Dates

Even if you don’t get a letter about your revalidation, you’re still required to file by the due date, which may require you to manually check Medicare’s Revalidation List. CMS starts posting revalidation dates on the website seven months before they’re due.

4. Your Providers Will Typically Have Different Revalidation Dates

If the providers at your practice enrolled in Medicare on different dates, they will each have different revalidation timelines. This means you won’t just have one deadline that covers the entire practice, you’ll have several to track, depending on how many providers and suppliers are at your practice.

5. You Can Process Revalidations Three Months Before Due Date

As long as your revalidation deadline is three months or fewer away, you can revalidate. Medicare won’t accept revalidations prior to that or afterward, so the three-month window is important to track. Therefore, if your revalidation is due December 31, you should be able to submit starting on October 1.

Want more information about PECOS enrollment and revalidation? Credentialing expert Yesenia Servin, CPMSM, PESC provides step-by-step tips you can use to master PECOS during the online training, PECOS: Practical Strategies to Cut Confusion & Improve Accuracy. During this 60-minute training, you’ll find out how to complete your enrollments correctly the first time to avoid payment interruptions. Sign up today!


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